Black & Decker DCM100B 12-Cup Coffee Maker

Before I share my initiation to the Black & Decker DCM100B Coffee Maker, I have to explain that I’m a complete technophobe. I don’t even own a cell phone, and my grandkids think it’s great fun to point out to their friends the obsolete item attached to my wall, which I use “like a cell”. None of these kids have even had a land-line at home in their lifetime, so my phone’s old fashioned-ness is, ironically, a novelty to them. Along the same lines, I’ve been brewing coffee for decades the way I first learned to do it: with a percolator.

No intimidating buttons, no electricity needed, just my trusty percolator and my comforting routine. But I made the mistake (I thought at the time) of enthusing about the coffee my son served after dinner during the holidays, so my kids decided it was time to drag me into a new century (possibly even the current one) and they ganged up on me with a Christmas gift of an electronic coffee maker.

Black & Decker DCM100B 12-Cup Coffee Maker

Black & Decker DCM100B Coffee Maker product features:

  • 12-cup capacity
  • Programmable for automated timed brewing
  • Water window level indicator
  • Automated warming plate shut-off
  • Pause to pour function allows removal of carafe during brewing
  • Built-in cord storage
  • Dishwasher-safe removable filter basket
  • Duralife unbreakable glass carafe
  • 2-year limited warranty

I know the family could tell that my Christmas-time thanks were forced politeness, and they know me well enough to understand that a plug-in appliance with any sort of programming buttons is guaranteed to make me anxious, so they very kindly included a certificate with my Black & Decker DCM100B Coffee Maker, redeemable for a “coffee-making lesson” from my teenage granddaughter. Well, they had me trapped with that; I couldn’t surreptitiously return it with her coming over to demonstrate it, so there was nothing left to do but humor them all. And enjoy the bonus time with my usually-busy granddaughter.

She arrived on the appointed afternoon and took the Scary Machine out of its box, and I prepared myself to get confused. If there are any coffee-technology hold-outs remaining out there, let me describe for you how this goes: she plugged in the machine. She opened the top and measured the coffee grounds into a basket—just like I do with my percolator. She poured water into a chamber — just like I do with my percolator. And she pressed the round button on the base of the machine. I was still waiting for the confusing part to start as coffee began to perk into the glass carafe. Really, that’s it.

She showed me how I could lift out the decanter while the machine was still brewing, pour a cup of coffee for each of us, and return it to its position without any mess. She showed me how the burner under the coffee pot keeps it hot for a couple hours, and assured me that it turns itself off, so I don’t have to worry about anything after hitting the “brew” button. She showed me how the basket where she had put the coffee grounds lifts right out so I can wash it. And (after asking what time I like to get up in the morning) she punched a couple buttons, and told me the machine can have coffee waiting for me when I woke up, if I choose. She had done the programming, so if I want magical morning coffee, I can just put in the coffee grounds and the water the night before and press this button (she showed me) — and the Black & Decker DCM100B Coffee Maker does the rest. It’s really that simple. Maybe everyone else in America has already discovered the joys of the coffee maker, but I’m enjoying the delightful novelty.